MILF (Part 2)

“Mom, I’m begging you please don’t go…Please.”

It’s the night before Career Day at my 15-year-old son’s school and I have been asked by one of his high school administrators to come in and speak to the students about the “perks” of being an attorney. My son has been trying for the past month and a half to convince me not to go because according to him his friends think I am a MILF.

After several discussions, a lot of help from you guys in the blogging community, and a whole lot of thought I told my son that I am, in fact, going to participate in Career Day. He was not happy but we had managed to reach a compromise. The compromise was I would make presentations to the Freshmen, Juniors, and Seniors and skip the Sophomores all together since Blake, my son, is a Sophomore. He had agreed to this compromise a few weeks ago but here he comes again, the night before the actual event, begging and pleading with me to not show up to his school the next morning.

I was forced to pull rank on him and let him know I am in charge here, the decision had been made and I was going; besides I would never ever forfeit the commitment I had made at this last-minute.

As he left for school the morning of Career Day he warned me not to try to discipline any of the students if they weren’t listening to me, or if they “spoke out of turn” or “acted up”. He asked me “to leave the discipline to the teachers”. I was a little surprised by this and started wondering for a second what the hell I was walking into. I assured him the only person I would ever discipline is him. I explained to him I would never under any circumstances try to discipline a human I didn’t give birth to.

Blake didn’t kiss me goodbye, as he usually does, as he slouched off to school that morning.

My energy was low from a very busy week and it was pouring rain as I traveled to his school and all of that affected my mood. I grew nervous as I thought about all the conversations we had concerning the issue and how adamant he was that he did not want me in his school, around his friends and all the ridiculous reasons why. I started second guessing my decision to go, so much so I had to reach out to my bestie for a pep talk and a little encouragement.

The bestie’s pep talk worked and by the time I arrived for Career Day, I was feeling like my confident, vivacious self again. I picked up my schedule from the library, confirmed that there were no sophomore classes on it and proceeded up the staircase to find my first class for the day.

My first stop was a bunch of eager Juniors in an AP English class, who had a ton of questions for me. It felt like they wanted to know everything about the law and the practice thereof from the actual Law School application process, to my favorite area of practice and they even wanted to know what a typical work day for me was like in the Courtroom or at the office. They even asked if it was difficult for me to balance my personal/family life with my work obligations, which I thought was an excellent question.

My first presentation went very well and it only got better from there. By the time I got to my third class for the day I was well into the groove and it all began to feel effortless and natural. I actually started wishing I had Blake in one of my scheduled classes so I could impress him. πŸ˜ƒ

At lunch, I met a Judge I had appeared before some years ago. What are the chances, huh?! I remembered his face and his name. I wasn’t surprised he didn’t remember me but I found out that he was an alumnus of my son’s school. He commended me on taking time out of my busy solo practitioner schedule to actually “give back” to my “son’s school”. As we chatted over our baked ziti I told him about the inordinate amount of resistance I faced from my son about attending Career Day and he assured me that it was “typical teenage boy reaction”. He said his son, who is now an adult, put his wife through the same thing. He said, “Your son is secretly proud of you but he probably won’t tell you until he’s about 25”.

Meeting Judge S was the highlight of my day and as we parted ways at the end of lunch he assured me that if my son was “gung-ho” for me to show up at his school for any reason whatsoever he wouldn’t be “normal”. My conversation with him was comforting and he advised me to “show up again next year” if given the opportunity.

I only had one Freshman class for the day and they were exhausting, enthusiastic but exhausting. The teacher left me alone with them for only a quick minute and it seemed that during that minute everyone had a question at the same time. They were my toughest crowd, and they reminded me of the astounding difference in the maturity levels of teenagers. The Freshmen were not shy with their line of questioning though, they were all about the money and wanted to know how much money I made and whether or not it was worth it to go to Law School.

I spent 7 hours at Blake’s school and I didn’t run into him even once. I thought for sure I would have bumped into him in the hallways as the students went from one class to the next or while they collected books from their lockers but my son managed to avoid me all day. I did see 2 of his friends though, who went out of their way to make sure I saw them and said hi to me. I was tempted to ask about Blake’s whereabouts but thought better of it.

At the end of the day, I went to the main office to say hello to the Dean of Academic Affairs, who told me that he had seen Blake earlier and asked him if he was excited that his Mom was participating in Career Day. Blake’s response, “She’s certainly excited. I am not.” Ouch!

All in all, it was a great day. I am glad I made the decision to be a part of Career Day and I can’t wait for next year to do it all over again. πŸ˜‰

92 thoughts on “MILF (Part 2)

  1. Once again I missed your post! But I found it. πŸ˜€ I’m so glad you went. Sounds like a great experience for everyone. And the validation and assurance from the judge was wonderful! I’m glad you did what you thought was best!!! Has Blake said anything since then?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Blake’s still complaining that the boys find me attractive (well those weren’t the exact words he used). πŸ™‚

      He had a barrage of questions concerning my experience…He wanted to know which classes I had, how I was received by the students, did the the teachers like me, what exactly did I talk about etc. I offered no information though…I believe my response was, “If you wanted to know you’d have allowed me to do one of your classes.” πŸ˜‚

      Like

  2. Hi R – well first of all – somehow you got some pictures of you in action and that made the post come alive even more.
    And glad you did not acquiesce – because who knows the rippling effect your talk will have – the next chief justice of the supreme court could have been one of those students at a desk who was inspired by what you shared.
    and nice to connect with the judge (I love when small fruits happen when we serve – it is just a perk of giving and thinking of outreach)
    and I have two boys and they had different seasons with how they felt about my involvement with their activities – and loved it when they let me in without any tension

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I had no idea you had two boys. If you don’t mind me asking, how old are they? Would have loved to have gotten your perspective on MILF (Part 1) when I was struggling with the decision.

      Wouldn’t it be fantastic if in 30 years the next Chief Justice when being sworn in reference my talk and call me by name?😁 My only hope is that when that happens Blake is around to hear it.😏

      Yes, P, the pics did help the post come alive. The school’s resident photographer was on hand to take photos of the various presenters so after she was done snapping away with her camera I asked her to indulge me with my phone. I was happy she complied.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I am trying to get pictures whenever possible and so that was a good idea to hand her your phone –
        I will check out the first post – and I am not good at followling bloggers regularly (I try- but the best way for is sometimes the reader – and then it is amtter of catching recent posts – and then I try and visit those who leave a comment on my blog – and so whew – when you left that fun comment on the red dresses post – well I remembered our MJ chat)
        so anyhow, – I will go and read that MILF part 1 now –
        and both boys are college-age and son1 is getting married this year – and his fiance’ is awesome and I give God all the glory that he found her

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thank God the fiancee is fantastic. It’s great that you love her it will make his married life with her so much easier. Praying that when my Blakey takes a wife that we both love each other. 😁

        Liked by 1 person

      3. well just from what I sense here – with your caring about his needs with the school visit – well I bet you will be a cool mother-n-law – just feel it – and I hope to be –

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  3. This was so inspiring for me to read! You know, as I was reading, I couldn’t help but think about that song, Stacie’s Mom! πŸ˜‰ I’m glad you “stuck to your guns” and went through with career day. Great photos, I feel your passion, and I’m glad you received so much support.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ Theresaly, that song!!!! I loooove that song. I even have it on my iPod. LOL at the analogy of my situation with Blake and that song.

      I, too, am glad I stuck to my guns and went. I honestly felt liked the students were interested in all I had to say, even for the last session of school when everyone, including myself, was restless they still gave me their undivided attention and asked very pertinent questions. It was a great experience and I have zero regrets.

      I appreciate your comment, girlfriend. Thank you for reminding me of that song. Gonna go find it on my iPod right now and give it a listen. I might even do some dancing too. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

      1. πŸ˜€ Yes, I wonder how Blake thinks about that song! πŸ˜‰ You had a great crowd of students. It’s not always easy to have undivided attention when they’re playing with their cell phones. Kudos to you!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I saw you comment on someone’s blog and I went: “Hey, I wonder how the MILF day went”, so I came here and saw the post. Kudos to you for doing it and surviving it.

    How was Blake AFTER the whole thing?

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    1. Hey Goldie, how ya been?

      Even afterwards he made sure to let me know he still thought I shouldn’t have gone. He said some kid stated to him at the end of the school day that he wants me to be his attorney because I’m “thick”. πŸ˜‘πŸ™„

      The next day, however, while we were having breakfast Blake was trying to get details from me about my experience at Career Day. He wanted to know which classes I had, which teachers, what I said, the questions I had been asked, how the teachers reacted to me etc. I was very tight lipped and evasive with my response….I pretty much told him that if he wants to know how it went down he should have agreed to have me in at least one of his classes. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m OK, but missing Coffee and his shenanigans.

        You show him!

        I dislike it when people ask you questions about situations they removed themselves from only to point out your potential blunders, etc.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m so glad you went. When I read part 1 I hoped you’d go. I understood your son’s feelings, but I knew his classmates would be respectful and interested in what you had to say. I was a teenage boy myself once and was quite capable of focusing.
    I also liked how Poe, Twain, and Shakespeare were all in the back of the room listening to you, because they also recognized the value of your perspective.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚ Literally laughing out loud at “Poe, Twain, and Shakespeare”. Be careful, I might come to expect one of these witty, hilarious comments from you each and every time I publish a blog post. πŸ˜‚

      Thanks for sharing your clever comment, Christopher. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Might I say first, that I LOVE that second pic…lol, it totally expressed how you said you were feeling…lol.

    I’m SOOOO proud of you for going to Career Day, it feels good to have best friends that could swoop in and give us a boost, so glad you had someone to call on even when you were down.

    All in all, it turned out to be a fantastic day, although I’m sure by the end of it, you were very exhausted. Also glad you ran into the judge! It always makes me feel good when someone else has experienced something similar to me or had gone through what I’m going through. Glad he was there to give you a boost as well.

    All in all, I’m very proud of you. Good Job Sis =)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So much love for your commentary, Roshonda. πŸ’œβ€πŸ’šπŸ§‘πŸ’›πŸ’™πŸ–€

      Yes, girl, by the end of the day I was too through….Exhausted times 10. I have so much respect for teachers who have to do this everyday. Dealing with scores of teenagers for hours on end is exhausting! Dang it!!

      The 2nd picture was of me listening to a Freshman’s question. Homeboy, was trying to find out how much money I make. πŸ˜‚

      I’m glad I went though, so glad I have an entire year to reset reset before going back to another Career Day. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A BIG LOL to your pic comment!! As you stated, they’re freshmen so it was all about the money to them as opposed to the questions from the upper class. Girl, I don’t know how teachers nor daycare workers do….God bless them…I know I couldn’t. Yessssss, reset because there will be a round #2. I just feel it =)

        Liked by 1 person

  7. I had to go back and read Part I first so I could get situated with Part II. Yeah, of course your son would come off as annoyed and embarrassed that his friends “like” you but that was obvious cover for his fierce sense of protection against the *penetrating* stares of his buddies. Interesting see how the votes for/against were sort of cut down the middle. In the end, though, all went well!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I thought the divide was very interesting too. I noted that most of the men and the women with teenage children thought it best that I sit it out while the women with older children or those without children thought it best that I attend. Really interesting!

      I appreciate you taking the time to check out both posts and I’m psyched you took the time to comment. All’s well that ends well they say. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. So I got home a few hours (I took myself the movies afterward) after he did and here’s how the conversation went:

      Blake: How was Career Day?
      Me: Great.
      Blake: The school day hadn’t even ended properly and they were already talking about you.
      Me: Really?!
      Blake: One Freshman came over to me and said, “I want your Mom to be my attorney, she’s thick.”
      Me: Thick?
      Blake: Yeah, Mom…Thick…He’s talking about your butt.
      Me: Stop exaggerating.
      Blake: I told you not to go.
      Me: Wait until you get to school Monday there’ll be more…Now turn down your TV.

      End of conversation. πŸ˜‚

      Thanks for asking though…The next day he wanted a blow by blow of all the classes I presented to but I was tight lipped about it. πŸ˜‚

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Happy to hear career day was a success. The fact that the students were so enthusiastic about you being there and had so many questions gives me faith in their generation. And I’m sure for many of them, you’re the first attorney they’ve ever met. It would’ve been interesting for Blake and his classmates to have you in their class. I’m quite sure they would’ve seen you in a different light. Maybe next year. A year may make a difference in Blake’s maturity as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m so glad you went, I have to agree with that judge, your son is extremely proud of you. But he won’t tell you until he’s older, these are boys for you. Cheers to you and your sons career day appearance!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Huntress Darling, I know you know, especially since you have raised 3 wonderful young men. Do they ever tell you that they’re proud of you? I know you’re very proud of the men they’ve become. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi Rakkelle, they tell me all the time, especially my youngest, which is definitely awesome to hear. Of course they didn’t until they became adults. I think as teenagers they don’t know how or aren’t emotionally mature enough to put their feelings into words. Give it time he’ll tell you and will do so often my friend. πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  10. So many blog glitches! I love WP, but they really need to get their act together. Ridiculous that people are losing followers, likes, and notifications.

    Anyway, I don’t understand your son. I get that kids don’t want to stand out from their peers and be embarrassed, but lots of parents were doing career day, and you have a great career to be proud of! You weren’t showing up at his school on some random day alone to lecture or coming in with an oddball career. I’m not understanding what his perspective is ~ because you’re so pretty? That just doesn’t make SENSE. I did read the first post and still don’t get it. Oh well. You stuck to your mission and were successful. That’s important. I’m glad you didn’t back down!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think is hang up isn’t because I’m “so pretty” (I wish πŸ™‚), I think his hang up is with the comments made by his friends regarding my body.

      I know you raised a daughter which I hear is very different from raising a son so it might be a bit difficult to understand although admittedly I really can’t figure it out myself. I really don’t get the seriousness of the problem, his problem, I mean. I have always thought his approach to this entire thing is a bit dramatic, to say the least, but I was glad to hear from the Judge regarding his own experiences with his own son and his wife. Maybe, just maybe, Blake is normal. Might I add, however, that normal is relative. πŸ˜‚

      When Blake turns 25 and finally tells me how proud he is of me I will be happy to remind him of the unnecessary stress he put me through with Career Day 2019.

      Thanks for reading and sharing your opinion Paula.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure. Yes, daughters are different. They actually became super protective of me, hating their father because he was so emotionally abusive, and hating anyone I dated because of any red flag. Even now, they worry about me all the time, which is nice but…

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    1. Wow, I’m glad you went but understand on so many levels just how hard this was for both you and your boy! I hung on the words of your judge friend too and hope it’s true, the our teen boys are secretly proud of us especially when they don’t tell us.

      So glad you followed up with this!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Hello Rakkelle I am proud of you for going to Career Day at your son’s school. I never thought any school kid would not want their parents to attend those days. I never went to any career days at my daughters schools.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I have been through that myself. Divorces are tough. I’m actually glad I didn’t move too geographically far away from my Ex-husband, that way he could still spend quality time with Blake and participate in school activities….Yeah, divorces are tough.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yes, I know your son is fortunate to have excess to his Father. Something that I missed out on with my daughters. I am working on making up for what we missed out on. You are right divorces are tough Rakkelle .

        Liked by 1 person

  12. I think you absolutely did the right thing to go! You have probably inspired some to follow your career path and that is an admirable thing. Your son is also just normal I would say… I recall also feeling uneasy when my school world clashed with my parents world but for me the chances of seeing both my parents were higher as principal and teacher at my school! However now looking back I’m very proud of them πŸ™πŸ»πŸ˜Œ

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Sorry I missed the first part of this debate ( all caught up now) You certainly did right. It’s a proud moment for and child. But your son will get over his issues soon enough. Way to go! Yay.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Sadje.

      Confession: I was wondering where you were for the first part of this debate, all because you’re one of my loyal readers. πŸ™‚ I had missed you for that one.

      Glad you agreed with my decision.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, sometimes the notifications disappear if you check after a longer time period. I try not to miss any posts of the blogs I follow. You did right. In fact if you had backed down, I think your son would have been a bit disappointed.

        Liked by 2 people

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